Just sayin'

This pretty cool about my blog – 2013 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 25,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 9 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

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Discovery Church, FASTING, God and your bod

Guest blogger Brenda Lummer

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A Note from Brenda

Steve and I have been amazed to see what God has done in our lives over the years through fasting and prayer. We can only imagine what He has in store for us over the next few weeks and the year ahead, not only for our family, but for your family and our church.
One resource we have used is, Living in the Raw: Recipes for Healthy Living. The book is available in most bookstores. It has great information on food content and combinations that have sparked a lot of creative ideas about how to use fruits and vegetables.
Some people will enjoy using the book to prepare meals of raw food without cooking — you’ll find information about using the sprouting technique and food dehydrators to help make it happen. I do not use it for this, but as a way to gain information about ingredients and new food combinations. Much of the book has been useful to me (the salad dressings are interesting) and I will often modify the recipes to create a cooked version of the soups and other dishes.

I hope this guide and these recipes help you stay healthy, creative, and focused on Him throughout our 21-day fast together!

Blessings and healthy living friends.

Brenda

 

 

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Discovery Church, FASTING, God and your bod

Just a few more ideas on our 21 day fast

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This information was primarily taken from the book “Fasting For Spiritual Breakthrough: A Guide to Nine Biblical Fasts” by Elmer L. Towns, published in 1996 by Regal Books, Ventura, California.

Our body is designed to heal itself. When a disease enters our body from bad dietary habits or from the outside, our bodies begin to fight it. Doctors, surgery, or medicines are most often designed to remove the source of the problem, but the healing is done by the body itself. Many common diseases are easily prevented with basic good nutrition and exercise habits.

STEP ONE: BE SPECIFIC
Daniel was not vague in his objection to the Babylonian diet. He defined the problem immediately.

1. The king’s food was against dietary laws.
2. Daniel and his friends had vowed against wine.
3. The king’s food had been offered up to idols/demons.

STEP TWO: FAST AS A SPIRITUAL COMMITMENT
The Daniel Fast involves a spiritual commitment to God. “Daniel proposed in his heart that he would not defile himself” (Dan. 1:8).

STEP THREE: REFLECT INNER DESIRE BY OUTER DISCIPLINE
Many people have an inner desire for better health, but they can’t discipline themselves to avoid junk food, and other foods that were not good for health. The physical health you seek from God may be more than an answer to prayer. Your physical health may be linked to any of the following factors:

a. Your food choices.
b. The level of your spiritual commitment as reflected in constant prayer during the fast.
c. Your time commitment. If you determine to fast for a certain time, keep it. For example, if you determine to fast 10 days, don’t stop on Day 9.
d. Your testimony commitment. Your fast is a statement of faith to God that you want Him to heal your body.

Faith is foundational to the Daniel Fast.

SOME HELPFUL HEALTHY RECIPES

Thick and Creamy Corn-Potato Soup
6 ears corn (cut off the cob)
6 medium-large red potatoes (chopped in 1/2 inch pieces)
6 carrots (finely chopped)
1 medium-large onion (finely chopped)
2 green peppers (finely chopped)
2 bay leaves
3 teaspoons thyme
2 teaspoons marjoram
3 teaspoons cumin
2 teaspoons sea salt
2 teaspoons pepper
3 32oz. boxes of vegetable broth
water
Put vegetables and spices in a large soup pot. Cook on medium heat, stirring occasionally for 15 minutes. Add broth and maintain a light boil. Cook 45 minutes to 1 hour. Remove from heat. Blend 3/4 of the soup mixture in a blender in batches. Put blended soup in a large bowl or container until the blending process is complete. Pour the blended soup back into the pot. Add water to thin and obtain the desired consistency. Heat through and serve. Serves 8-10 generously.

 

Tomato Basil Soup
12 Vine Ripe Tomatoes
1 Package Cherry Tomatoes
2 1/2 Cups Fresh Carrot Juice (or Odwalla available in juice section)
1 Large Ripe Avocado
2 Yellow Onions (chopped)
4 Cloves Garlic (chopped)
5 Stems Fresh Basil
2 Tablespoons Pure Honey
1 Bay Leave
1 teaspoon Oregano
1 teaspoon Sea Salt
1 Tablespoon Red Pepper Flakes
2 Tablespoons Olive Oil
Cook onion and garlic in olive oil until tender. Cut tomatoes and avocado in quarters and place all ingredients in blender and blend on low speed for one minute. Continue to blend on high for an additional minute until creamy. Pour into large soup bowl or crock pot and cook on medium low for 2 to 3 hours.

Portabello Steaks
6 portabello mushroom caps
1/2 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons Pure Maple syrup
2 teaspoons fresh grated ginger
1/2 teaspoon marjoram
Wash mushrooms and place in a gallon size plastic sealable bag. Combine remaining ingredients in a bowl and stir to combine. Add to the mushrooms and marinate for a few hours. Grill indoors or out until cooked through.
Serve with baked sweet potatoes and grilled squash and asparagus.
Grilled Vegetables
Toss yellow squash, zucchini, and asparagus with 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil. Salt and Pepper to taste. Grill indoors or out until tender.
Baked Sweet Potatoes
Wash sweet potatoes, prick with a fork several times and place in a 400 degree oven for an hour and a half. Less time may be needed if potatoes are small.

 

 
Vegetable Barley Soup
Choose your vegetables. Really, anything can work depending upon your taste.
My picks:
3 cups chopped celery
2cups chopped white onion
3 cups chopped carrots
3 cups chopped green/yellow/red pepper
3 cups thin sliced mushrooms
2 cups chopped roma tomatoes (peeled and seeded)
2 32oz. boxes vegetable broth
Use your favorite spices. I choose 2 cloves garlic, sea salt to taste, 2 teaspoons marjoram flakes, 2 teaspoons oregano flakes, 1 bay leaf and 1 teaspoon parsley. Pour ¼ cup vegetable broth in a soup pot. Add all of the vegetables and saute them until tender. Add the spices and stir to mix. Add the remaining vegetable broth. Bring to a boil and add 1 cup Natural Whole Grain Barley. Boil for 15-20 minutes until the barley is tender.
Serves 6
For thicker soup, just blend 1/2 of the vegetable mixture (prior to putting in the barley) in a blender. Add it back to the soup pot and then add the barley.

Guacamole
Blend ripe avocados in a food processor with juice from 1 large lime, 2 cloves garlic, 1 roma tomato and a dash of salt. If you like spice, you can add 1/4 of a jalapeno pepper seeded.
Serve on black beans, portobello mushrooms or use as a dip with vegetables.

 

Baked Apples or Pears
Slice a pear or apple in half. Use a grapefruit spoon to scoop out the seeds and the tough, center portion. Place halves, skin side down, in a glass baking dish. Brush with ½ teaspoon pure maple syrup and sprinkle with cinnamon. Microwave for 10 minutes or until tender. Serve warm.

 

The Breaker’s Granola
5 cups raw oatmeal
1 cup finely chopped walnuts
1 cup slivered raw almonds
1 cup finely chopped cashews
1 cup unsalted sunflower seeds
1/2 cup flax seed
1 cup finely chopped dry figs
1 cup finely chopped apricots (unsweetened if possible)
1/4 cup chopped coconut
2 cups unsweetened raisins
2 Tablespoons cinnamon
Mix together in a large bowl. Keep in tightly sealed container such as tupperware in the pantry. To serve cold, soak 1/2 cup granola in unsweetened plain soy milk for a few minutes. To serve warm, you can prepare with water or unsweetened soy milk in the microwave. Use 1 cup liquid to 1/2 cup granola. Warm for a minute on high or more if desired.
Note: Chop the nuts and fruits in a food processor individually and then add them to the oats.

Gazpacho
6 med. tomatoes, quartered
2 large cucumbers
1 small red onion
1 med. zucchini, chopped
3 med. garlic cloves, smashed
1 med. green bell pepper
chopped fresh herbs: parsley, basil, chives
2 Tbsp. lemon juice
2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1 tsp. sea salt
1 tsp. cayenne pepper
1 tsp. ground cumin seed
2 cups vegetable stock or tomato juice
1. In food processor, combine tomatoes, cucumbers, onion, zucchini, garlic, and green pepper and process on high until coarsely chopped.
2. Add herbs, lemon juice, oil, salt, cayenne, and cumin. Process a few more burst. Blend in stock or tomato juice.
3. Transfer to large bowl. Refrigerate at least 1 hour before serving.
Serves 4. Preparation Time:10 minutes.
Vegetarian Spaghetti Squash
Slice squash in half lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds with a spoon as you would a pumpkin. Then completely submerge both halves in boiling water and cook for about 20 to 25 minutes, or until the inside is tender to a fork and pulls apart in strands. (It is better to undercook if you are not sure). Remove, drain, and cool with cold water or an ice bath to stop the cooking. Then use a fork to scrape the cooked squash out of its skin, and at the same time, fluff and separate the squash into spaghetti-like strands. Discard the skin. Reheat the squash strands by dipping with a strainer in boiling water just before serving.
You can also bake the spaghetti squash in the oven. Just scoop seeds out as described above and prick outside skin with a fork. Place skin side up in a baking pan with 1 inch water. Bake 45 minutes or until tender in a 400 degree oven. Remove and allow to cool for a few minutes until they can be handled. Scrape with a fork as mentioned above and serve with stir fried sauce.
Stir Fried Sauce
10 Roma tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and chopped coarsely
2 cups thinly sliced mushrooms
2 cloves garlic
2 cups chopped broccoli florets or 1 package baby spinach
2 teaspoons oregano (powdered or flakes)
Sea salt to taste
Saute mushrooms and onion with garlic and oregano. Add tomatoes and other vegetables. Cook until tender and heated through. Toss in a large bowl with spaghetti squash strands. Serve hot. 6 servings

Brown Rice with Edamame and Vegetables
2 cups brown rice
4 cups water or vegetable broth
1 cup fresh squeezed orange juice
1 package frozen, shelled edamame
1 cup shredded carrots
1 cup sliced white mushrooms
½ teaspoon cumin
1 clove garlic minced
½ cup chopped green onion
Combine orange juice and water/broth in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Add brown rice and bring back to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to low. Simmer for 45 minutes to 1 hour. Remove lid to let steam escape and set aside.
While rice is cooking, prepare edamame according to package directions but without salt. Drain in a sieve. Saute garlic, cumin, mushroom and carrot just until tender (do not overcook). Put rice in a large bowl and add the edamame and other vegetables. Top with chopped green onion.
Servings:4-6 entrée size
Serve with orange slices and celery sticks.
Cuban Black Beans & Rice with Tomato Salsa
1 package dried black beans
Vegetable broth (1- 32oz. box)
Chili powder
Chipotle powder
2 cloves garlic
Soak beans overnight in water (cover w/2 inches above beans). Drain and rinse beans. Place beans in sauce pan and add vegetable broth. Add water to cover if needed. Add spices and boil for 1 hour and then simmer until tender (follow package direction if available). Prepare brown rice according to package directions.
Salsa
Roma Tomatoes quartered
Lime
Cilantro
Green onion (1 bunch)
Chili powder
Cumin
Garlic
In a food processor, chop tomato, cilantro, green onion with chili powder, garlic, cumin and lime juice by pulsing the blade several times to desired texture. We prefer chunky.
Place rice on individual dishes and top with beans and salsa.
Serves: 6 entrée size
Serve with sliced mango and papaya and lime juice.

Toasted Nut Snack
Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees. Place raw walnuts, almonds, cashews or other desired nuts on a baking sheet. Bake for 15 minutes or until slightly browned. Cool completely and mix in a bowl with unsweetened raisins.
We keep this on the counter for a quick snack.

Honey and Oat Cereal
Prepare Oatmeal with Soy Milk or Water. Sweeten with Honey and a dash of cinnamon.

 

I hope this guide and these recipes help you stay healthy, creative, and focused on Him throughout our 21-day fast together!

Steve and Brenda Lummer

Discovery Church

 

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Discovery Church

How To Keep Your Dreams Alive

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How to keep your dreams alive even when they steal your coat.

Sunday January 26th, 2014
If you want a dream that will last a lifetime …. Y ou need to get a dream that is bigger than LIFE!

Our dreams should be BIG ENOUGH TO OUT LIVE US!

I DON’T HAVE A DREAM – IT HAS ME!

A DREAM will
1. A DREAM WILL TEST YOU.
2. A DREAM WILL COST YOU.
3. A DREAM WILL SHAPE YOU.

Joseph Actually had more than a coat of many colors…He had many coats.
THE THREE COATS OF A DREAMER

1. The coat of GRACE.
Now Israel loved Joseph more than all his children, because he was the son of his old age. Also he made him a tunic of many colors. Genesis 37:3

It was a gift ——– it was a covering

1 corinthians 4:7 – What do you have that you did not receive?
Eph 2:8,9 For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— 9 not by works, so that no one can boast.

2. The coat of A GODLY CHARACTER .
But it happened about this time, when Joseph went into the house to do his work, and none of the men of the house was inside, 12 that she caught him by his garment, saying, “Lie with me.” But he left his garment in her hand, and fled and ran outside. Genesis 39:11,12

THE COAT OF SALVATION – THE GIFT OF GOD’S GRACE –.
THE COAT OF CHARACTER – THE GIFT OF OUR RACE

Jesus BROKE THE CURSE of sin so you could BREAK THE CYCLE of sin.

3. The coat of LEGACY and OVERCOMING.
Then Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Inasmuch as God has shown you all this, there is no one as discerning and wise as you. 40 You shall be over my house, and all my people shall be ruled according to your word; only in regard to the throne will I be greater than you.” 41 And Pharaoh said to Joseph, “See, I have set you over all the land of Egypt.” – 42 Then Pharaoh took his signet ring off his hand and put it on Joseph’s hand; and he clothed him in garments of fine linen and put a gold chain around his neck. Genesis 41:39-42

Revelation 3:21 – To him who overcomes I will grant to sit with Me on My throne, as I also overcame and sat down with My Father on His throne.

The Genesis 50:20 principle. – Let God continue the process of turning the bad that happened to you into the good of his purpose –
“You intended to harm me, but God intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives.” – I can see Jesus saying that while he sits at the right side of the father after he saw his dream come true.

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Discovery Church

Discovery Dreams part 1

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Discovery Dreams
Part 1
Pastor Steve Lummer

“Joseph had a dream” – Genesis 37:5

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1. JOSEPH’S NAME MEANS “TO ADD”
“She named him Joseph, and said, “May the Lord add to me another son.” – Genesis 30:24

What’s in a NAME? – Discovery

dis·cov·er  – verb
1. find (something or someone) unexpectedly or in the course of a search.
“Gold miners discovery gold in at Sutter’s Mill”
synonyms: – find, locate, come across/upon, stumble on, chance on, light on, bring to light, uncover, unearth, turn up; track down

We have a vision here at Discovery Church.
Our vision is to:

LOVE GOD

CONNECT PEOPLE

DISCOVER CHRIST

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2. WE  ARE THE CHURCH WE’VE BEEN LOOKING FOR.

Our core values

1. We Value a Shared Vision
As leadership and congregation, we share and create the vision for the direction of the church, both presently, and in the future.

2. We Value Intentional Redemptive Relationships
We purpose to develop intentional redemptive relationships through Biblical teaching, discipleship, and fellowship.

3. We Value Connection With Our Community
We determine to connect with our community by consistent involvement with local needs and events.

4. We Value Edifying Worship
We strive to create and experience worship that exalts God and edifies people of all ages.

5. We Value Targeted Outreach
Our emphasis for outreach is to help people to discover and develop a new life in Christ.

6. We Value Outdoor Classrooms
We chose to use God’s creation as an opportunity for discipleship and fellowship.

7. We Value a Culture of Excellence
A culture of excellence is a movement of ordinary people attempting extraordinary things for God, and doing so, with great detail and skill.

8. We Value Biblical Integrity
As leadership, we commit to Biblical integrity by adhering to the truth and grace of God’s Word that trains people to live God’s way.

9. We Value a Culture of Servanthood
We strive to develop an atmosphere where people are not consumers but contributors to God’s work here on the earth.

10. We Value A Next Generation Focus
As leadership and congregation, we determine to reach, teach, and keep children for God’s kingdom.

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3. DREAMS ARE BORN NOT BORROWED AND START SOME SMALL HABITS THIS YEAR.

A couple of years ago, I read Malcolm Gladwell’s classic, The Tipping Point, and came across something that sociologists call “the broken window theory.”

It has been one of the most powerful and helpful tools for helping me understand why so many Christians get stuck and live the sad existence of miserable mediocrity and comfortable complacency. And for how to get out of it.

“The broken window theory” says that if want to reduce crime in a neighborhood, one of the first and most effective things you can do is to fix the broken windows. Literally. If there’s a section of town that’s run down, and violent crime, murders, and drug deals are on the upswing, sociologists have proven that by just fixing the broken windows on that block, those bigger issues are affected, and crime is diminished.

That seems preposterous to me. You’ve got this big problem, and you’re going to go waste your time doing something as simple as fixing a broken window? That’s like rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic as it heads toward the iceberg, isn’t it?

But it works. Apparently, it has to do with sending a signal that anarchy is no longer the rule of the day and that crime is no longer the status quo.

So what is at the heart of the “broken window theory?” If you boil it down, you essentially have two parts:

1) A big goal: reduce crime. 2) A small start: fix windows. But it’s the small start that makes the big goal possible.

From my experience, this is very true to form as far as what I’ve seen in people’s lives that don’t seem to have any traction and aren’t going anywhere. The problem isn’t just that they don’t think big enough. It’s also that they don’t start small enough. As a result, they usually give up quickly because their initial steps are too difficult. Or they never get started at all because their initial steps are too daunting.

A big dream without a small start is nothing but a daydream. God initiates the biggest changes in our lives through the little things.

You can’t have Apostle Paul’s walk with God overnight. Big dream.
But you can start praying two minutes a day starting tomorrow. Small start.

You can’t entirely mend a broken relationship overnight. Big dream.
But you can have a conversation and open the door, write the letter, make the call, say I’m sorry. Small start.

If your  child or friend is far from God, you can’t bring him back overnight. Big dream.
But you could you start praying for him every day. Small start.

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Pastor Steve Lummer

http://www.discoveryprescott.com

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Discovery Church

The Moken

moken-DC

The Moken

I would like to tell you about an interesting group of people who live the islands of Southeast Asia. These people are known as the Moken. Many surrounding cultures that have had encounters
with the Moken have given them the nickname “the gypsies fo the sea” due to the Moken’s nomadic lifestyle which involves moving from island to island and depending heavily on ocean
life for survival.
The Moken where among a very small group of Southeast Asian coastal inhabitants that survived the devastating tsunamis of 2004. They have such a deep connection to the ocean that they could read the behavior of the water long before the tsunamis arrived, thus giving them plenty of time to move to higher ground before the tsunamis struck the islands.
A very interesting fact about their language is that is does not contain any word for want.
Language exists to communicate ideas. The fact they have no word for “want” is evidence that the Moken live without any idea or notion of “want.”
To us Americans who are constantly surround by friends and companies telling us we need this or we don’t have that, it’s hard to image a life without a word for want or desire. Our lives are
even so enveloped in desire that it initally seems sad to us to not have desire. Now, obviouly the Moken have simple desires like the desire to survive/live, to eat, etc. But they have no way of communicating it because it’s not as important to them as it would be to you or me.
Where am I gong with this? New Years Day is the time of year when our focus makes a complete one-eighty. Instead of having a midset of generosity as we often do during the holidays,
we begin to focus on our desires and resolutions.
Our focus becomes centered on us and our own improvement.
Even though it is good to improve one’s self (and I encourage you to do so), let’s not forget the needs of others. What if we forgot our desires or even how communicate them because our focus was centered on the needs of others.

Let’s learn to not be in “wantoness”.

steveo

Pastor Steve

“Give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap. For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you.” – Luke 6:38

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